mercoledì 30 aprile 2014

A trip to Rome by Gayane Simonyan (second part): My visit to Coliseum


Author: Gayane Simonyan

The largest amphitheatre of the Roman Empire and one of the greatest works of Roman architecture and engineering is the Colosseum or Coliseum, also known as the Flavian Amphitheatre. It is the largest amphitheatre in the world built of concrete (a deposit of cement) and stone.

The Colosseum - used for gladiatorial contests and public spectacles such as mock sea battles, animal hunts, reenactments of famous battles, executions, and dramas based on Classical mythology - could hold between 50 - 80,000 spectators. The building ceased to be used for entertainment in the early medieval era.

Getting off the metro station called “Colosseo” in Rome, Italy you will see a huge antique building standing boldly in ruins that will definitely attract your attention. This is called Colosseo in Italian. Seeing a long- long queue in front of the two ticket spots and the entrance during tourist season, makes you more and more willing to enter it.

If you want to get familiar with the history of Colosseum, the guides are always there for you. Getting inside you will find yourself as a participant of the famous movie called “Gladiator” where Roman general Maximus Decimus Meridius rises through the ranks of the gladiatorial arena to avenge the murder of his family and his emperor.

Walking around you can find patterns of ruins with specific description that will help you have a general idea about the building and the stages it has gone through.

Enjoying the panorama, taking as many photos as possible you will spend around an hour and a half to explore it and then you will go out impressed and encouraged to share your impression and rapture with the others who didn’t have a chance to see it yet.

Getting out you will see a beautiful place with different columns, old structures and a bunch of tourists waiting for their turn to enter: this is a plaza, a square called Foro Romano or Roman Forum.



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