Thursday, December 18, 2014

Istituto Europeo: in case of dreams, please contact us





5 good reasons to study Italian:

1. You will learn a lot of words used for food, arts and fashion
2. You will be able to communicate with Italians in a short time
3. Italian is not only a language, it's a way of living: discover it
4. Italian is the language of love and beauty par excellence
5. Around 145 millions people speak Italian in the world


Contact us! info@istitutoeuropeo.it - www.istitutoeuropeo.it

Istituto Europeo: If you are ready to dream, please contact us





5 good reasons to study Italian:

1. You will learn a lot of words used for food, arts and fashion
2. You will be able to communicate with Italians in a short time
3. Italian is not only a language, it's a way of living: discover it
4. Italian is the language of love and beauty par excellence
5. Around 145 millions people speak Italian in the world


Contact us! info@istitutoeuropeo.it - www.istitutoeuropeo.it

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Istituto Europeo: Don't stop dreaming your dream



5 good reasons to study Italian:

1. You will learn a lot of words used for food, arts and fashion
2. You will be able to communicate with Italians in a short time
3. Italian is not only a language, it's a way of living: discover it
4. Italian is the language of love and beauty par excellence
5. Around 145 millions people speak Italian in the world


Contact us! info@istitutoeuropeo.it - www.istitutoeuropeo.it

How Sciascia challenges the detective novel genre

Leonardo Sciascia
by Olga Lenczewska


The detective novel is a rather popular and “light” genre of literature that usually serves to entertain the reader without imposing on him any particular ideology or making him reflect on his life. This is the case when it comes to Agatha Christie's novels or the stories written by Arthur Conan Doyle, to list two English individuals that are amongst the most popular crime novels authors in the world. The aim of these novels is to portray a crime story is such a way that the reader feels the suspense is growing and cannot stop reading the book until the very last chapter. At the beginning of the book we are always presented with a murder (or multiple murders) as well as with all the protagonists that are involved in the incident in one way or another. The psychological portrait of the characters is usually very detailed and complicated. Among these people there is always a clever detective or policeman (for example, Sherlock Holmes in Doyle's novels and Hercules Poirot or Miss Marple in Christie's books), whose ultimate goal is to solve the crime. Each chapter of a detective novel, moreover, is supposed to reveal a new trace, either through the investigator's private enquiry or an interrogation of the characters, which will eventually lead to discovering the murderer and his motives - the “truth” about the story.

The structure of the detective novel does not allow its author much flexibility and literary innovation. Perhaps that is why it has not been considered an ambitious genre. Despite this fact, one of the Italian novelists of the 20th century, Leonardo Sciascia, a Sicilian whose books belong to the canon of Italian literature, chose the detectve novel as the framework for the vast majority of his writings. Although Sciascia's books largely conform to the genre of the detective novel, there are ideological and structural elements that differ.

Sciascia’s novels, such as “A ciascuno il suo” or “Il giorno della civetta”, start with a murder or murders, continue with an individual trying to discover the truth about a murder case by investigating various traces, and end with the killer’s being revealed and the story explained. The incident is always depicted from a few different perspectives and the reader does not know what exactly has happened. Moreover, the act of the murder splits the plot into two parts – before and after, constituting a crucial turning point in the plot. The element of a puzzle – who killed and why – goes back to the classic detective novel of Doyle and Christie. Through deduction and linking various premises in Sciascia’s books, as much as in those written by Doyle or Christie, it is possible to unveil the real story.

However, not everything in Sciascia's novels conforms to the detective novel genre so easily. Often the murderer turns out not to be a single person but a whole criminal institution – the Sicilian Mafia – with all its legal and political tricks. Because of this fact the motives of the murders are usually political and social, not private. Moreover, Sciascia, unlike other crime authors, is aware that the state is not of much use when it comes to uncovering a murder story: “Lo stato – l'istituzione giudiziaria – non é in grado di conferire efficacia al paziente lavorio di ricostruzione dell'ispettore o del detective” [Ambroise, “Invito alla lettura di Sciascia”]. In Sciascia's crime novels the Mafia is portrayed as an institution that defines the mode of existence in Sicily. Against the standard detective novel, the writer goes beyond a simple plot and brings out the evil history of the island, represented by the silence and the collision between the Mafia’a own business and the welfare of ordinary Sicilian citizens. In such a way Sciascia demythologises and re-invents, or re-formulates, the genre of the detective novel.

To give an example, this social situation of the island is symbolically represented in the main protagonist of “A ciascuno il suo” (1966), professor Paolo Laurana. Laurana is the most frequently featured character of the book as well as a private investigator of the double murder which takes place at the beginning of the book. However, unlike the traditional detectives, he is not sufficiently equipped to perform his task because he is a literature teacher and has no experience with dealing with crime. He is presented by Sciascia negatively: he is an introvert, not very successful in his academic job, sexually repressed, and dominated by his mother. Laurana tries to reconstruct the relationship between Manno and Roscio, the two victims of the murder in “A ciascuno il suo”, by interrogating his friends and other citizens. He is not sure who is and who is not controlled by the Mafia, and therefore whom he can trust. Sciascia depicts this difficult situation “usando un rigoroso rispecchiamento di un paese della Sicilia dove la mafia controlla inesorabilmente uomini e cose” [Abruzzi, “Leonardo Sciascia e la Sicilia”]. In the novel the Mafia is opposed by a single person who is not even an investigator but plays a “game” of being one. Despite his honesty and desire to unveil the truth, Laurana fails to complete his task in the world of corruption and lack of definite ethical values. He does not in time realise the dishonesty of the people involved in the murder and in consequence his naivety leads him to death. The reader quickly realises that in Sicily the collision between the victims and the world of politics is so strong that Laurana is unable to change anything. Sciascia's honest and trustworthy detective is alone, and he is the only point on earth where corruption is rejected: his motive is ethical and abstract, and, therefore, incorruptible. The impotence of the investigator is opposed to the power of the Mafia, which reflects the general social and political situation of the Sicily of the 1960's.

In his hands the genre of the detective novel became a reflection on the political system and the social situation of Sicily. The collective and institutional murderer, the Mafia, is portrayed as an institution that defines the mode of existence on the island. The impotence and naivety of the detective Laurana from “A ciascuno il suo” symbolises the inability of the Italians from Sicily to take control over this collective murderer. Sciascia, therefore, re-formulates the genre of the detective novel by introducing the elements I presented above and, in consequence, bitterly unveiling the real situation in the Sicily of the 1960’s. His crime novels may be therefore said to constitute one big detective story which is based on real facts from the Sicilian life of the author and his neighbours.


Contact us! info@istitutoeuropeo.it - www.istitutoeuropeo.it


Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Florence People: Erik Smok the Magician - Following a voice

Erik under the David Statue at Piazzale Michelangelo


My name is Erik. I am a Magician.
I am a prestidigitator. 
How did I become a prestidigitator?
I followed a voice. Inside me there was a voice telling me the direction of my life.
And I became a magician. 
I like to be on the stage and performing tricks. It gives me power, it gives me adrenaline.
I live in Florence the city of magic. I absorb the magic of its lights, colors and forms. The history of Florence inspires me.
I couldn't have been a magician without living in this city.
It's magic it's my magic.


Contact us! info@istitutoeuropeo.it - www.istitutoeuropeo.it

Istituto Europeo: Don't stop dreaming your dream




5 good reasons to study Italian:

1. You will learn a lot of words used for food, arts and fashion
2. You will be able to communicate with Italians in a short time
3. Italian is not only a language, it's a way of living: discover it
4. Italian is the language of love and beauty par excellence
5. Around 145 millions people speak Italian in the world


Contact us! info@istitutoeuropeo.it - www.istitutoeuropeo.it

Monday, December 15, 2014

Frutta Candita, para endulzar esta Navidad


5 buenas razones para estudiar italiano:

1. Aprenderás cantidad de palabras que se usan para la comida, el arte y la moda
2. Serás capaz de comunicarte con italianos en poco tiempo
3. El italiano no es sólo una lengua, es un estilo de vida: descúbrelo
4. El italiano es por excelencia la lengua del amor y de la belleza
5. Alrededor de 145 millones de personas hablan italiano en el mundo


Contact us! info@istitutoeuropeo.it - www.istitutoeuropeo.it

Istituto Europeo: an open window on your dream






Istituto Europeo.
An open window on your dream.


Contact us! info@istitutoeuropeo.it - www.istitutoeuropeo.it
Florence, Italy

Thursday, December 11, 2014

All' Antico Vinaio, ¡los mejores paninos caseros de Florencia!



Por Ana Peinado

All' Antico Vinaio es un pequeño bar situado en Via de Neri, cerca de la Piazza Signoria. En una calle escondida, encontramos este curioso lugar, con aires tradicionales siendo el típico sitio al que llamaríamos “el bar de toda la vida”. No es un restaurante glamuroso, pero realmente merece la pena probar sus paninos. Una opción ideal para degustar un buen tentempié y un buen vinito.



Con una decoración sencilla y entrañable podemos probar uno de los mejores paninos de Florencia, por no decir el mejor.
Sus productos son de alta calidad, como el jamón y todo tipo de embutidos, quesos con una calidad y sabor inmejorable, salsas caseras típicas italianas, como la crema de oliva  o la de alcachofa.


Y lo mejor de todo, su pan. El pan crujiente tiene un sabor inmejorable y hace que los bocatas sean una verdadera delicia.


Es una ideal oportunidad para probar buenos productos de la Toscana con un buen vino.
Respecto al servicio, es rápido y eficaz. Además, son personas muy agradables y siempre andan con una sonrisa sea el día que sea.

Se recomienda ir sin prisas, ya que al ser un lugar conocido se suele crear un poco de cola los fines de semana y festivos. 
¡No puedes irte de Florencia sin probarlos! ¡Buon appetito!

Por Navidad regálate un sueño: estudia Italiano





5 buenas razones para estudiar italiano:

1. Aprenderás cantidad de palabras que se usan para la comida, el arte y la moda
2. Serás capaz de comunicarte con italianos en poco tiempo
3. El italiano no es sólo una lengua, es un estilo de vida: descúbrelo
4. El italiano es por excelencia la lengua del amor y de la belleza
5. Alrededor de 145 millones de personas hablan italiano en el mundo


Contact us! info@istitutoeuropeo.it - www.istitutoeuropeo.it


Friday, December 5, 2014

Ya es hora de poner el árbol, ¡feliz fin de semana!


¿Por qué estudiar italiano en Italia?
1. Es un país que te envolverá con su belleza  y su arte.
2. La lengua italiana es una de las más bonitas y cautivadoras que existen.
3. Más de 145 millones personas en el mundo hablan italiano.
4. Hablar la lengua italiana es también vivirla.
5. Porque el sueño italiano…sólo se vive en Italia.

Contact us! info@istitutoeuropeo.it - www.istitutoeuropeo.it

Domingo 7 de Diciembre: Museos de Florencia GRATIS

Cada domingo de cada mes los museos estatales de Florencia abren sus puertas sin costo alguno.
Aunque no hay que pagar al entrar, se recomienda llegar temprano al museo, para evitar largas colas.
¡Empápate del arte florentino y sus innumerables muestras de arte!

A continuación, os mostramos una lista de los museos que podéis visitar este domingo.

Galería de los Uffici
Ubicación: Piazzale degli Uffizi
Horario: 08:15-18:30



Galería de la Academia
Ubicación: Via Bettino Ricasoli, 60
Horario: 8:15 a 18:50


Galería Palatina y Galería de Arte Moderno
Ubicación: Piazza de Pitti
Horario: 8.15 a 18.50



Museo Nacional de Bargello
Ubicación: Via del Proconsolo
Horario: 8.15 a 13.50



Capillas Medici
Ubicación: Piazza Madonna degli Aldobrandini, 6
Horario: 8.15 a 18.00



Museo de San Marco
Ubicación: Via Camillo Cavour
Horario8.15 a 18.50


Museo arqueológico
UbicaciónPiazza Santissima Annunziata
Horario: 8.30 a 19:00





At Christmas give yourself a dream. Study Italian




5 good reasons to study Italian:

1. You will learn a lot of words used for food, arts and fashion
2. You will be able to communicate with Italians in a short time
3. Italian is not only a language, it's a way of living: discover it
4. Italian is the language of love and beauty par excellence
5. Around 145 millions people speak Italian in the world


Contact us! info@istitutoeuropeo.it - www.istitutoeuropeo.it


Wednesday, December 3, 2014

¡Bicicletas flotantes en Florencia!

Por Ana Peinado

En Florencia, la bicicleta es uno de los medios de transporte más aclamados por sus habitantes. Puedes desplazarte rápido por la ciudad, sin costo alguno y por supuesto, preservando el medio ambiente.
Pero para mi asombro, también las he encontrado flotando en el aire ¡y adornando las calles!
Al ser uno de los símbolos de la ciudad, para Navidad no podían faltar en la decoración de Florencia. Así que si las bicicletas van sobre el pavimento, ¿por qué no en el aire?
Una bonita manera de alumbrar las calles de la manera más original y reutilizando materiales, porque no solo sirven las bicis, ¡también las ruedas! 



En en el barrio Santo Spirito encontramos estas luces navideñas de lo más originales, dando un aire bohemio y fresco al barrio, al que se desplazan cientos de estudiantes cada día para tomar aperitivo, frecuentar los divertidos locales de la zona o degustar una pizza artesana a un precio estupendo.


¡No te pierdas esta original decoración y descubre en qué calle están!

Contact us! info@istitutoeuropeo.it - www.istitutoeuropeo.it

Tuesday, December 2, 2014

Panforte, dulce toscano para Navidad





Contact us! info@istitutoeuropeo.it - www.istitutoeuropeo.it

Power and Politics: Plato, Machiavelli, and Locke at ISTITUTO EUROPEO



STUDY ABROAD Independent study:
Power and Politics: Plato, Machiavelli, and Locke at ISTITUTO EUROPEO


Independent study (15 contact hours, 1 contact hour: 45’, of lesson and 30 completely independently by the student)


Italy is the land of politics for politics, where politics based itself only as self-assertion, the land where prevails the lack of reforms, that is murdered by too many worthless laws.
The country where democracy has no more need of vote (now three governments have being following each other without people's consensus).
The land where the president of Italian Republic acts as an intermediary of the strong powers who rule the world.
Come down with us to the roots of Machiavelic Italian politics to understand the incomprehensible policy of Italian politics


Who should wield political power and why? This course will look at this broad question through the work of three major political philosophers: Plato, Machiavelli, and Locke. Each thinker seems to have a distinctly different idea as to what makes political authority legitimate, yet close readings of their major texts will reveal similarities and overlap even amidst the striking diversity in their outlooks. We will work chronologically, being sure to place each man in his own historical context. With this grounding, we will explore the theories espoused, linking ideas both to their cultural milieux and then thinking more abstractly, comparing and contrasting the core principles each promoted

Contact us! info@istitutoeuropeo.it - www.istitutoeuropeo.it